iheartmyart is a repository for art, music and other items of interest which has been collected from around the internet. All images are either part of the public domain or owned and © by the respective holders. They are presented here for educational purposes within the “fair use” terms of US Code: Title 17, Sec. 107. If required, images can be removed by the artist upon request by email.



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Hana Omori, ’Baby blossom’, 2014

This piece of work was about the imbalance of the young and old in Japan. Being half Japanese I am concerned of the future of Japan and how this imbalance will and is effecting my family. My cousin Luna is 8 years old and is the only person in her year at school. I often wonder how this will affect her as she blossoms into a woman- with no one the same age as her to relate to.

Part of the Keiken Collective

______

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See more Hana Omori on iheartmyart.
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(via soyatree)

Studio Visit with Graham Day GuerraBushwick, Brooklyn, New York
iheartmyart was invited by artist, Yale MFA graduate and RISD professor, Graham Day Guerra to visit his studio to talk about his latest work and studio process. 
Readers will recognize Guerra’s earlier series works that include Athlete Ascension, Virgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega which capture a conglomeration of athletic bodies suspended above stadiums and other industrial spaces. These masses of human bodies were composed initially using digital 3D technology software, then rendered on paper by hand in graphite and charcoal. 
_____
iheartmyart: Tell us about some your earlier works that include Athlete Ascension, Virgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega.
Graham Guerra: I grew up Catholic; looking at images of saints ascending, or Jesus on the cross. As a consequence, I grew very fond of the aesthetic representation of the human body. 
Another part of my inspiration for this period of work also came from Leni Riefenstahl’s film, Olympia and her aestheticization of the human body. In Olympia, the human body is represented in the same way minus the cherubs and the garb of the Mary and the saints, the blood, etc. 
I think of the bodies in my work as a modern representation of the idolised religious mythic quality that Riefenstahl imbued into the bodies of the athletes in her films. Also, the modern day stadium as akin to the space where people experienced religious fervour in the past. 
I never felt that religious fervor but I have felt that there is something similar in experience of the stadium at night. 
iheartmyart: I can see what you mean. In the modern day sporting events, that take place in stadiums like the one that you have depicted in your work, there is typically that hole in the ceiling where a figure could be raised up to the sky. Similar to the way we metaphorically raise the sport players up to this same deity status of celebrity.
The work I see around the studio is a bit different. Tell us about some of these pieces. 
Graham Guerra: Some of my recent work layers architectural floor plans of religious spaces with scientific illustrations from educational text books. 
I wanted to use these illustrations in ways that they were never intended to use. I like the idea that art makes a mess of things and can be used to aestheticize things. They don’t have to be right. They can be totally wrong. 
iheartmyart: In some ways, it is the modern experience of being an adult. Where we have to shift through concepts and have to formulate our subjective opinion. 
Do you feel like this work was influence by your teaching?
Graham Guerra: Maybe a little bit. But more just how I reflect upon my own learning or mislearning. I was very interested in science as a kid. I would have been a scientist if i hadn’t gone into the arts. Both my grandfather and father were scientists. 
Most recently, I have been doing the same layering of the illustrations but moving away from the high contrast. I have been creating works with gold leaf and exploring the role that the patina places in portraying the effects of time.
iheartmyart: Were you concerned with the contrast because you felt that within the layering that some meaning was being lost? 
Graham Guerra:  In the end, I think when making artwork, as much as one might like to control it, so much of the learning comes from making stuff with your hands. I knew I wanted the new works to be different from the previous pieces. 
Many times, I think about materials as metaphor. My criteria for particular works is, what type of relationship do these materials have with the subject matter? In the case of these pieces, I was thinking about carbon as the basic building block of organic life. A lot of these things have to do with the human body as the starting point for different measurement systems. You can see this one pieces it starts off with architecture and moves up to the solar system; this other piece shows the scales of the human body, moving from Vitruvian man, carbon atom, an animal cell and different shakras. 
The most recent pieces are related to the organic natural of things and I used silver to achieve something more elemental in the material. I am experimenting with that now. 
iheartmyart: Thank you for sharing. 
____
See more on:♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
More Graham Day Guerra on iheartmyart.More studio visits on iheartmyart.
____
If you would like iheartmyart to visit your studio, please contact us.  Studio Visit with Graham Day GuerraBushwick, Brooklyn, New York
iheartmyart was invited by artist, Yale MFA graduate and RISD professor, Graham Day Guerra to visit his studio to talk about his latest work and studio process. 
Readers will recognize Guerra’s earlier series works that include Athlete Ascension, Virgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega which capture a conglomeration of athletic bodies suspended above stadiums and other industrial spaces. These masses of human bodies were composed initially using digital 3D technology software, then rendered on paper by hand in graphite and charcoal. 
_____
iheartmyart: Tell us about some your earlier works that include Athlete Ascension, Virgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega.
Graham Guerra: I grew up Catholic; looking at images of saints ascending, or Jesus on the cross. As a consequence, I grew very fond of the aesthetic representation of the human body. 
Another part of my inspiration for this period of work also came from Leni Riefenstahl’s film, Olympia and her aestheticization of the human body. In Olympia, the human body is represented in the same way minus the cherubs and the garb of the Mary and the saints, the blood, etc. 
I think of the bodies in my work as a modern representation of the idolised religious mythic quality that Riefenstahl imbued into the bodies of the athletes in her films. Also, the modern day stadium as akin to the space where people experienced religious fervour in the past. 
I never felt that religious fervor but I have felt that there is something similar in experience of the stadium at night. 
iheartmyart: I can see what you mean. In the modern day sporting events, that take place in stadiums like the one that you have depicted in your work, there is typically that hole in the ceiling where a figure could be raised up to the sky. Similar to the way we metaphorically raise the sport players up to this same deity status of celebrity.
The work I see around the studio is a bit different. Tell us about some of these pieces. 
Graham Guerra: Some of my recent work layers architectural floor plans of religious spaces with scientific illustrations from educational text books. 
I wanted to use these illustrations in ways that they were never intended to use. I like the idea that art makes a mess of things and can be used to aestheticize things. They don’t have to be right. They can be totally wrong. 
iheartmyart: In some ways, it is the modern experience of being an adult. Where we have to shift through concepts and have to formulate our subjective opinion. 
Do you feel like this work was influence by your teaching?
Graham Guerra: Maybe a little bit. But more just how I reflect upon my own learning or mislearning. I was very interested in science as a kid. I would have been a scientist if i hadn’t gone into the arts. Both my grandfather and father were scientists. 
Most recently, I have been doing the same layering of the illustrations but moving away from the high contrast. I have been creating works with gold leaf and exploring the role that the patina places in portraying the effects of time.
iheartmyart: Were you concerned with the contrast because you felt that within the layering that some meaning was being lost? 
Graham Guerra:  In the end, I think when making artwork, as much as one might like to control it, so much of the learning comes from making stuff with your hands. I knew I wanted the new works to be different from the previous pieces. 
Many times, I think about materials as metaphor. My criteria for particular works is, what type of relationship do these materials have with the subject matter? In the case of these pieces, I was thinking about carbon as the basic building block of organic life. A lot of these things have to do with the human body as the starting point for different measurement systems. You can see this one pieces it starts off with architecture and moves up to the solar system; this other piece shows the scales of the human body, moving from Vitruvian man, carbon atom, an animal cell and different shakras. 
The most recent pieces are related to the organic natural of things and I used silver to achieve something more elemental in the material. I am experimenting with that now. 
iheartmyart: Thank you for sharing. 
____
See more on:♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
More Graham Day Guerra on iheartmyart.More studio visits on iheartmyart.
____
If you would like iheartmyart to visit your studio, please contact us.  Studio Visit with Graham Day GuerraBushwick, Brooklyn, New York
iheartmyart was invited by artist, Yale MFA graduate and RISD professor, Graham Day Guerra to visit his studio to talk about his latest work and studio process. 
Readers will recognize Guerra’s earlier series works that include Athlete Ascension, Virgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega which capture a conglomeration of athletic bodies suspended above stadiums and other industrial spaces. These masses of human bodies were composed initially using digital 3D technology software, then rendered on paper by hand in graphite and charcoal. 
_____
iheartmyart: Tell us about some your earlier works that include Athlete Ascension, Virgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega.
Graham Guerra: I grew up Catholic; looking at images of saints ascending, or Jesus on the cross. As a consequence, I grew very fond of the aesthetic representation of the human body. 
Another part of my inspiration for this period of work also came from Leni Riefenstahl’s film, Olympia and her aestheticization of the human body. In Olympia, the human body is represented in the same way minus the cherubs and the garb of the Mary and the saints, the blood, etc. 
I think of the bodies in my work as a modern representation of the idolised religious mythic quality that Riefenstahl imbued into the bodies of the athletes in her films. Also, the modern day stadium as akin to the space where people experienced religious fervour in the past. 
I never felt that religious fervor but I have felt that there is something similar in experience of the stadium at night. 
iheartmyart: I can see what you mean. In the modern day sporting events, that take place in stadiums like the one that you have depicted in your work, there is typically that hole in the ceiling where a figure could be raised up to the sky. Similar to the way we metaphorically raise the sport players up to this same deity status of celebrity.
The work I see around the studio is a bit different. Tell us about some of these pieces. 
Graham Guerra: Some of my recent work layers architectural floor plans of religious spaces with scientific illustrations from educational text books. 
I wanted to use these illustrations in ways that they were never intended to use. I like the idea that art makes a mess of things and can be used to aestheticize things. They don’t have to be right. They can be totally wrong. 
iheartmyart: In some ways, it is the modern experience of being an adult. Where we have to shift through concepts and have to formulate our subjective opinion. 
Do you feel like this work was influence by your teaching?
Graham Guerra: Maybe a little bit. But more just how I reflect upon my own learning or mislearning. I was very interested in science as a kid. I would have been a scientist if i hadn’t gone into the arts. Both my grandfather and father were scientists. 
Most recently, I have been doing the same layering of the illustrations but moving away from the high contrast. I have been creating works with gold leaf and exploring the role that the patina places in portraying the effects of time.
iheartmyart: Were you concerned with the contrast because you felt that within the layering that some meaning was being lost? 
Graham Guerra:  In the end, I think when making artwork, as much as one might like to control it, so much of the learning comes from making stuff with your hands. I knew I wanted the new works to be different from the previous pieces. 
Many times, I think about materials as metaphor. My criteria for particular works is, what type of relationship do these materials have with the subject matter? In the case of these pieces, I was thinking about carbon as the basic building block of organic life. A lot of these things have to do with the human body as the starting point for different measurement systems. You can see this one pieces it starts off with architecture and moves up to the solar system; this other piece shows the scales of the human body, moving from Vitruvian man, carbon atom, an animal cell and different shakras. 
The most recent pieces are related to the organic natural of things and I used silver to achieve something more elemental in the material. I am experimenting with that now. 
iheartmyart: Thank you for sharing. 
____
See more on:♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
More Graham Day Guerra on iheartmyart.More studio visits on iheartmyart.
____
If you would like iheartmyart to visit your studio, please contact us.  Studio Visit with Graham Day GuerraBushwick, Brooklyn, New York
iheartmyart was invited by artist, Yale MFA graduate and RISD professor, Graham Day Guerra to visit his studio to talk about his latest work and studio process. 
Readers will recognize Guerra’s earlier series works that include Athlete Ascension, Virgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega which capture a conglomeration of athletic bodies suspended above stadiums and other industrial spaces. These masses of human bodies were composed initially using digital 3D technology software, then rendered on paper by hand in graphite and charcoal. 
_____
iheartmyart: Tell us about some your earlier works that include Athlete Ascension, Virgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega.
Graham Guerra: I grew up Catholic; looking at images of saints ascending, or Jesus on the cross. As a consequence, I grew very fond of the aesthetic representation of the human body. 
Another part of my inspiration for this period of work also came from Leni Riefenstahl’s film, Olympia and her aestheticization of the human body. In Olympia, the human body is represented in the same way minus the cherubs and the garb of the Mary and the saints, the blood, etc. 
I think of the bodies in my work as a modern representation of the idolised religious mythic quality that Riefenstahl imbued into the bodies of the athletes in her films. Also, the modern day stadium as akin to the space where people experienced religious fervour in the past. 
I never felt that religious fervor but I have felt that there is something similar in experience of the stadium at night. 
iheartmyart: I can see what you mean. In the modern day sporting events, that take place in stadiums like the one that you have depicted in your work, there is typically that hole in the ceiling where a figure could be raised up to the sky. Similar to the way we metaphorically raise the sport players up to this same deity status of celebrity.
The work I see around the studio is a bit different. Tell us about some of these pieces. 
Graham Guerra: Some of my recent work layers architectural floor plans of religious spaces with scientific illustrations from educational text books. 
I wanted to use these illustrations in ways that they were never intended to use. I like the idea that art makes a mess of things and can be used to aestheticize things. They don’t have to be right. They can be totally wrong. 
iheartmyart: In some ways, it is the modern experience of being an adult. Where we have to shift through concepts and have to formulate our subjective opinion. 
Do you feel like this work was influence by your teaching?
Graham Guerra: Maybe a little bit. But more just how I reflect upon my own learning or mislearning. I was very interested in science as a kid. I would have been a scientist if i hadn’t gone into the arts. Both my grandfather and father were scientists. 
Most recently, I have been doing the same layering of the illustrations but moving away from the high contrast. I have been creating works with gold leaf and exploring the role that the patina places in portraying the effects of time.
iheartmyart: Were you concerned with the contrast because you felt that within the layering that some meaning was being lost? 
Graham Guerra:  In the end, I think when making artwork, as much as one might like to control it, so much of the learning comes from making stuff with your hands. I knew I wanted the new works to be different from the previous pieces. 
Many times, I think about materials as metaphor. My criteria for particular works is, what type of relationship do these materials have with the subject matter? In the case of these pieces, I was thinking about carbon as the basic building block of organic life. A lot of these things have to do with the human body as the starting point for different measurement systems. You can see this one pieces it starts off with architecture and moves up to the solar system; this other piece shows the scales of the human body, moving from Vitruvian man, carbon atom, an animal cell and different shakras. 
The most recent pieces are related to the organic natural of things and I used silver to achieve something more elemental in the material. I am experimenting with that now. 
iheartmyart: Thank you for sharing. 
____
See more on:♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
More Graham Day Guerra on iheartmyart.More studio visits on iheartmyart.
____
If you would like iheartmyart to visit your studio, please contact us.  Studio Visit with Graham Day GuerraBushwick, Brooklyn, New York
iheartmyart was invited by artist, Yale MFA graduate and RISD professor, Graham Day Guerra to visit his studio to talk about his latest work and studio process. 
Readers will recognize Guerra’s earlier series works that include Athlete Ascension, Virgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega which capture a conglomeration of athletic bodies suspended above stadiums and other industrial spaces. These masses of human bodies were composed initially using digital 3D technology software, then rendered on paper by hand in graphite and charcoal. 
_____
iheartmyart: Tell us about some your earlier works that include Athlete Ascension, Virgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega.
Graham Guerra: I grew up Catholic; looking at images of saints ascending, or Jesus on the cross. As a consequence, I grew very fond of the aesthetic representation of the human body. 
Another part of my inspiration for this period of work also came from Leni Riefenstahl’s film, Olympia and her aestheticization of the human body. In Olympia, the human body is represented in the same way minus the cherubs and the garb of the Mary and the saints, the blood, etc. 
I think of the bodies in my work as a modern representation of the idolised religious mythic quality that Riefenstahl imbued into the bodies of the athletes in her films. Also, the modern day stadium as akin to the space where people experienced religious fervour in the past. 
I never felt that religious fervor but I have felt that there is something similar in experience of the stadium at night. 
iheartmyart: I can see what you mean. In the modern day sporting events, that take place in stadiums like the one that you have depicted in your work, there is typically that hole in the ceiling where a figure could be raised up to the sky. Similar to the way we metaphorically raise the sport players up to this same deity status of celebrity.
The work I see around the studio is a bit different. Tell us about some of these pieces. 
Graham Guerra: Some of my recent work layers architectural floor plans of religious spaces with scientific illustrations from educational text books. 
I wanted to use these illustrations in ways that they were never intended to use. I like the idea that art makes a mess of things and can be used to aestheticize things. They don’t have to be right. They can be totally wrong. 
iheartmyart: In some ways, it is the modern experience of being an adult. Where we have to shift through concepts and have to formulate our subjective opinion. 
Do you feel like this work was influence by your teaching?
Graham Guerra: Maybe a little bit. But more just how I reflect upon my own learning or mislearning. I was very interested in science as a kid. I would have been a scientist if i hadn’t gone into the arts. Both my grandfather and father were scientists. 
Most recently, I have been doing the same layering of the illustrations but moving away from the high contrast. I have been creating works with gold leaf and exploring the role that the patina places in portraying the effects of time.
iheartmyart: Were you concerned with the contrast because you felt that within the layering that some meaning was being lost? 
Graham Guerra:  In the end, I think when making artwork, as much as one might like to control it, so much of the learning comes from making stuff with your hands. I knew I wanted the new works to be different from the previous pieces. 
Many times, I think about materials as metaphor. My criteria for particular works is, what type of relationship do these materials have with the subject matter? In the case of these pieces, I was thinking about carbon as the basic building block of organic life. A lot of these things have to do with the human body as the starting point for different measurement systems. You can see this one pieces it starts off with architecture and moves up to the solar system; this other piece shows the scales of the human body, moving from Vitruvian man, carbon atom, an animal cell and different shakras. 
The most recent pieces are related to the organic natural of things and I used silver to achieve something more elemental in the material. I am experimenting with that now. 
iheartmyart: Thank you for sharing. 
____
See more on:♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
More Graham Day Guerra on iheartmyart.More studio visits on iheartmyart.
____
If you would like iheartmyart to visit your studio, please contact us.  Studio Visit with Graham Day GuerraBushwick, Brooklyn, New York
iheartmyart was invited by artist, Yale MFA graduate and RISD professor, Graham Day Guerra to visit his studio to talk about his latest work and studio process. 
Readers will recognize Guerra’s earlier series works that include Athlete Ascension, Virgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega which capture a conglomeration of athletic bodies suspended above stadiums and other industrial spaces. These masses of human bodies were composed initially using digital 3D technology software, then rendered on paper by hand in graphite and charcoal. 
_____
iheartmyart: Tell us about some your earlier works that include Athlete Ascension, Virgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega.
Graham Guerra: I grew up Catholic; looking at images of saints ascending, or Jesus on the cross. As a consequence, I grew very fond of the aesthetic representation of the human body. 
Another part of my inspiration for this period of work also came from Leni Riefenstahl’s film, Olympia and her aestheticization of the human body. In Olympia, the human body is represented in the same way minus the cherubs and the garb of the Mary and the saints, the blood, etc. 
I think of the bodies in my work as a modern representation of the idolised religious mythic quality that Riefenstahl imbued into the bodies of the athletes in her films. Also, the modern day stadium as akin to the space where people experienced religious fervour in the past. 
I never felt that religious fervor but I have felt that there is something similar in experience of the stadium at night. 
iheartmyart: I can see what you mean. In the modern day sporting events, that take place in stadiums like the one that you have depicted in your work, there is typically that hole in the ceiling where a figure could be raised up to the sky. Similar to the way we metaphorically raise the sport players up to this same deity status of celebrity.
The work I see around the studio is a bit different. Tell us about some of these pieces. 
Graham Guerra: Some of my recent work layers architectural floor plans of religious spaces with scientific illustrations from educational text books. 
I wanted to use these illustrations in ways that they were never intended to use. I like the idea that art makes a mess of things and can be used to aestheticize things. They don’t have to be right. They can be totally wrong. 
iheartmyart: In some ways, it is the modern experience of being an adult. Where we have to shift through concepts and have to formulate our subjective opinion. 
Do you feel like this work was influence by your teaching?
Graham Guerra: Maybe a little bit. But more just how I reflect upon my own learning or mislearning. I was very interested in science as a kid. I would have been a scientist if i hadn’t gone into the arts. Both my grandfather and father were scientists. 
Most recently, I have been doing the same layering of the illustrations but moving away from the high contrast. I have been creating works with gold leaf and exploring the role that the patina places in portraying the effects of time.
iheartmyart: Were you concerned with the contrast because you felt that within the layering that some meaning was being lost? 
Graham Guerra:  In the end, I think when making artwork, as much as one might like to control it, so much of the learning comes from making stuff with your hands. I knew I wanted the new works to be different from the previous pieces. 
Many times, I think about materials as metaphor. My criteria for particular works is, what type of relationship do these materials have with the subject matter? In the case of these pieces, I was thinking about carbon as the basic building block of organic life. A lot of these things have to do with the human body as the starting point for different measurement systems. You can see this one pieces it starts off with architecture and moves up to the solar system; this other piece shows the scales of the human body, moving from Vitruvian man, carbon atom, an animal cell and different shakras. 
The most recent pieces are related to the organic natural of things and I used silver to achieve something more elemental in the material. I am experimenting with that now. 
iheartmyart: Thank you for sharing. 
____
See more on:♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
More Graham Day Guerra on iheartmyart.More studio visits on iheartmyart.
____
If you would like iheartmyart to visit your studio, please contact us.  Studio Visit with Graham Day GuerraBushwick, Brooklyn, New York
iheartmyart was invited by artist, Yale MFA graduate and RISD professor, Graham Day Guerra to visit his studio to talk about his latest work and studio process. 
Readers will recognize Guerra’s earlier series works that include Athlete Ascension, Virgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega which capture a conglomeration of athletic bodies suspended above stadiums and other industrial spaces. These masses of human bodies were composed initially using digital 3D technology software, then rendered on paper by hand in graphite and charcoal. 
_____
iheartmyart: Tell us about some your earlier works that include Athlete Ascension, Virgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega.
Graham Guerra: I grew up Catholic; looking at images of saints ascending, or Jesus on the cross. As a consequence, I grew very fond of the aesthetic representation of the human body. 
Another part of my inspiration for this period of work also came from Leni Riefenstahl’s film, Olympia and her aestheticization of the human body. In Olympia, the human body is represented in the same way minus the cherubs and the garb of the Mary and the saints, the blood, etc. 
I think of the bodies in my work as a modern representation of the idolised religious mythic quality that Riefenstahl imbued into the bodies of the athletes in her films. Also, the modern day stadium as akin to the space where people experienced religious fervour in the past. 
I never felt that religious fervor but I have felt that there is something similar in experience of the stadium at night. 
iheartmyart: I can see what you mean. In the modern day sporting events, that take place in stadiums like the one that you have depicted in your work, there is typically that hole in the ceiling where a figure could be raised up to the sky. Similar to the way we metaphorically raise the sport players up to this same deity status of celebrity.
The work I see around the studio is a bit different. Tell us about some of these pieces. 
Graham Guerra: Some of my recent work layers architectural floor plans of religious spaces with scientific illustrations from educational text books. 
I wanted to use these illustrations in ways that they were never intended to use. I like the idea that art makes a mess of things and can be used to aestheticize things. They don’t have to be right. They can be totally wrong. 
iheartmyart: In some ways, it is the modern experience of being an adult. Where we have to shift through concepts and have to formulate our subjective opinion. 
Do you feel like this work was influence by your teaching?
Graham Guerra: Maybe a little bit. But more just how I reflect upon my own learning or mislearning. I was very interested in science as a kid. I would have been a scientist if i hadn’t gone into the arts. Both my grandfather and father were scientists. 
Most recently, I have been doing the same layering of the illustrations but moving away from the high contrast. I have been creating works with gold leaf and exploring the role that the patina places in portraying the effects of time.
iheartmyart: Were you concerned with the contrast because you felt that within the layering that some meaning was being lost? 
Graham Guerra:  In the end, I think when making artwork, as much as one might like to control it, so much of the learning comes from making stuff with your hands. I knew I wanted the new works to be different from the previous pieces. 
Many times, I think about materials as metaphor. My criteria for particular works is, what type of relationship do these materials have with the subject matter? In the case of these pieces, I was thinking about carbon as the basic building block of organic life. A lot of these things have to do with the human body as the starting point for different measurement systems. You can see this one pieces it starts off with architecture and moves up to the solar system; this other piece shows the scales of the human body, moving from Vitruvian man, carbon atom, an animal cell and different shakras. 
The most recent pieces are related to the organic natural of things and I used silver to achieve something more elemental in the material. I am experimenting with that now. 
iheartmyart: Thank you for sharing. 
____
See more on:♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
More Graham Day Guerra on iheartmyart.More studio visits on iheartmyart.
____
If you would like iheartmyart to visit your studio, please contact us.  Studio Visit with Graham Day GuerraBushwick, Brooklyn, New York
iheartmyart was invited by artist, Yale MFA graduate and RISD professor, Graham Day Guerra to visit his studio to talk about his latest work and studio process. 
Readers will recognize Guerra’s earlier series works that include Athlete Ascension, Virgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega which capture a conglomeration of athletic bodies suspended above stadiums and other industrial spaces. These masses of human bodies were composed initially using digital 3D technology software, then rendered on paper by hand in graphite and charcoal. 
_____
iheartmyart: Tell us about some your earlier works that include Athlete Ascension, Virgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega.
Graham Guerra: I grew up Catholic; looking at images of saints ascending, or Jesus on the cross. As a consequence, I grew very fond of the aesthetic representation of the human body. 
Another part of my inspiration for this period of work also came from Leni Riefenstahl’s film, Olympia and her aestheticization of the human body. In Olympia, the human body is represented in the same way minus the cherubs and the garb of the Mary and the saints, the blood, etc. 
I think of the bodies in my work as a modern representation of the idolised religious mythic quality that Riefenstahl imbued into the bodies of the athletes in her films. Also, the modern day stadium as akin to the space where people experienced religious fervour in the past. 
I never felt that religious fervor but I have felt that there is something similar in experience of the stadium at night. 
iheartmyart: I can see what you mean. In the modern day sporting events, that take place in stadiums like the one that you have depicted in your work, there is typically that hole in the ceiling where a figure could be raised up to the sky. Similar to the way we metaphorically raise the sport players up to this same deity status of celebrity.
The work I see around the studio is a bit different. Tell us about some of these pieces. 
Graham Guerra: Some of my recent work layers architectural floor plans of religious spaces with scientific illustrations from educational text books. 
I wanted to use these illustrations in ways that they were never intended to use. I like the idea that art makes a mess of things and can be used to aestheticize things. They don’t have to be right. They can be totally wrong. 
iheartmyart: In some ways, it is the modern experience of being an adult. Where we have to shift through concepts and have to formulate our subjective opinion. 
Do you feel like this work was influence by your teaching?
Graham Guerra: Maybe a little bit. But more just how I reflect upon my own learning or mislearning. I was very interested in science as a kid. I would have been a scientist if i hadn’t gone into the arts. Both my grandfather and father were scientists. 
Most recently, I have been doing the same layering of the illustrations but moving away from the high contrast. I have been creating works with gold leaf and exploring the role that the patina places in portraying the effects of time.
iheartmyart: Were you concerned with the contrast because you felt that within the layering that some meaning was being lost? 
Graham Guerra:  In the end, I think when making artwork, as much as one might like to control it, so much of the learning comes from making stuff with your hands. I knew I wanted the new works to be different from the previous pieces. 
Many times, I think about materials as metaphor. My criteria for particular works is, what type of relationship do these materials have with the subject matter? In the case of these pieces, I was thinking about carbon as the basic building block of organic life. A lot of these things have to do with the human body as the starting point for different measurement systems. You can see this one pieces it starts off with architecture and moves up to the solar system; this other piece shows the scales of the human body, moving from Vitruvian man, carbon atom, an animal cell and different shakras. 
The most recent pieces are related to the organic natural of things and I used silver to achieve something more elemental in the material. I am experimenting with that now. 
iheartmyart: Thank you for sharing. 
____
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____
If you would like iheartmyart to visit your studio, please contact us.  Studio Visit with Graham Day GuerraBushwick, Brooklyn, New York
iheartmyart was invited by artist, Yale MFA graduate and RISD professor, Graham Day Guerra to visit his studio to talk about his latest work and studio process. 
Readers will recognize Guerra’s earlier series works that include Athlete Ascension, Virgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega which capture a conglomeration of athletic bodies suspended above stadiums and other industrial spaces. These masses of human bodies were composed initially using digital 3D technology software, then rendered on paper by hand in graphite and charcoal. 
_____
iheartmyart: Tell us about some your earlier works that include Athlete Ascension, Virgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega.
Graham Guerra: I grew up Catholic; looking at images of saints ascending, or Jesus on the cross. As a consequence, I grew very fond of the aesthetic representation of the human body. 
Another part of my inspiration for this period of work also came from Leni Riefenstahl’s film, Olympia and her aestheticization of the human body. In Olympia, the human body is represented in the same way minus the cherubs and the garb of the Mary and the saints, the blood, etc. 
I think of the bodies in my work as a modern representation of the idolised religious mythic quality that Riefenstahl imbued into the bodies of the athletes in her films. Also, the modern day stadium as akin to the space where people experienced religious fervour in the past. 
I never felt that religious fervor but I have felt that there is something similar in experience of the stadium at night. 
iheartmyart: I can see what you mean. In the modern day sporting events, that take place in stadiums like the one that you have depicted in your work, there is typically that hole in the ceiling where a figure could be raised up to the sky. Similar to the way we metaphorically raise the sport players up to this same deity status of celebrity.
The work I see around the studio is a bit different. Tell us about some of these pieces. 
Graham Guerra: Some of my recent work layers architectural floor plans of religious spaces with scientific illustrations from educational text books. 
I wanted to use these illustrations in ways that they were never intended to use. I like the idea that art makes a mess of things and can be used to aestheticize things. They don’t have to be right. They can be totally wrong. 
iheartmyart: In some ways, it is the modern experience of being an adult. Where we have to shift through concepts and have to formulate our subjective opinion. 
Do you feel like this work was influence by your teaching?
Graham Guerra: Maybe a little bit. But more just how I reflect upon my own learning or mislearning. I was very interested in science as a kid. I would have been a scientist if i hadn’t gone into the arts. Both my grandfather and father were scientists. 
Most recently, I have been doing the same layering of the illustrations but moving away from the high contrast. I have been creating works with gold leaf and exploring the role that the patina places in portraying the effects of time.
iheartmyart: Were you concerned with the contrast because you felt that within the layering that some meaning was being lost? 
Graham Guerra:  In the end, I think when making artwork, as much as one might like to control it, so much of the learning comes from making stuff with your hands. I knew I wanted the new works to be different from the previous pieces. 
Many times, I think about materials as metaphor. My criteria for particular works is, what type of relationship do these materials have with the subject matter? In the case of these pieces, I was thinking about carbon as the basic building block of organic life. A lot of these things have to do with the human body as the starting point for different measurement systems. You can see this one pieces it starts off with architecture and moves up to the solar system; this other piece shows the scales of the human body, moving from Vitruvian man, carbon atom, an animal cell and different shakras. 
The most recent pieces are related to the organic natural of things and I used silver to achieve something more elemental in the material. I am experimenting with that now. 
iheartmyart: Thank you for sharing. 
____
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More Graham Day Guerra on iheartmyart.More studio visits on iheartmyart.
____
If you would like iheartmyart to visit your studio, please contact us. 

    Studio Visit with Graham Day Guerra
    Bushwick, Brooklyn, New York

    iheartmyart was invited by artist, Yale MFA graduate and RISD professor, Graham Day Guerra to visit his studio to talk about his latest work and studio process. 

    Readers will recognize Guerra’s earlier series works that include Athlete AscensionVirgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega which capture a conglomeration of athletic bodies suspended above stadiums and other industrial spaces. These masses of human bodies were composed initially using digital 3D technology software, then rendered on paper by hand in graphite and charcoal. 

    _____

    iheartmyart: Tell us about some your earlier works that include Athlete AscensionVirgin Assumption and Alpha and Omega.

    Graham Guerra: I grew up Catholic; looking at images of saints ascending, or Jesus on the cross. As a consequence, I grew very fond of the aesthetic representation of the human body. 

    Another part of my inspiration for this period of work also came from Leni Riefenstahl’s film, Olympia and her aestheticization of the human body. In Olympia, the human body is represented in the same way minus the cherubs and the garb of the Mary and the saints, the blood, etc. 

    I think of the bodies in my work as a modern representation of the idolised religious mythic quality that Riefenstahl imbued into the bodies of the athletes in her films. Also, the modern day stadium as akin to the space where people experienced religious fervour in the past. 

    I never felt that religious fervor but I have felt that there is something similar in experience of the stadium at night. 

    iheartmyart: I can see what you mean. In the modern day sporting events, that take place in stadiums like the one that you have depicted in your work, there is typically that hole in the ceiling where a figure could be raised up to the sky. Similar to the way we metaphorically raise the sport players up to this same deity status of celebrity.

    The work I see around the studio is a bit different. Tell us about some of these pieces. 

    Graham Guerra: Some of my recent work layers architectural floor plans of religious spaces with scientific illustrations from educational text books.

    I wanted to use these illustrations in ways that they were never intended to use. I like the idea that art makes a mess of things and can be used to aestheticize things. They don’t have to be right. They can be totally wrong. 

    iheartmyart: In some ways, it is the modern experience of being an adult. Where we have to shift through concepts and have to formulate our subjective opinion. 

    Do you feel like this work was influence by your teaching?

    Graham Guerra: Maybe a little bit. But more just how I reflect upon my own learning or mislearning. I was very interested in science as a kid. I would have been a scientist if i hadn’t gone into the arts. Both my grandfather and father were scientists. 

    Most recently, I have been doing the same layering of the illustrations but moving away from the high contrast. I have been creating works with gold leaf and exploring the role that the patina places in portraying the effects of time.

    iheartmyart: Were you concerned with the contrast because you felt that within the layering that some meaning was being lost? 

    Graham Guerra:  In the end, I think when making artwork, as much as one might like to control it, so much of the learning comes from making stuff with your hands. I knew I wanted the new works to be different from the previous pieces. 

    Many times, I think about materials as metaphor. My criteria for particular works is, what type of relationship do these materials have with the subject matter? In the case of these pieces, I was thinking about carbon as the basic building block of organic life. A lot of these things have to do with the human body as the starting point for different measurement systems. You can see this one pieces it starts off with architecture and moves up to the solar system; this other piece shows the scales of the human body, moving from Vitruvian man, carbon atom, an animal cell and different shakras. 

    The most recent pieces are related to the organic natural of things and I used silver to achieve something more elemental in the material. I am experimenting with that now. 

    iheartmyart: Thank you for sharing. 

    ____

    See more on:
    ♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list pinterest  

    More Graham Day Guerra on iheartmyart.
    More studio visits on iheartmyart.

    ____

    If you would like iheartmyart to visit your studio, please contact us. 

    Illustration that was sourced by Jindrich Styrsky, The Statue of Liberty, 1934

    Erecting the Statue of Liberty at the Harbor Entrance, New York, New York

    (via archiveofaffinities)

    ______

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    See more illustration on iheartmyart.

    Lynn Nguyen, Untitled, 2014

    You may bury my body
    down by the highway side
    So my old evil spirit
    Can catch a Greyhound bus and ride

    - Robert Johnson, Me and the Devil Blues

    Tumblr: teething | personal blog | official folio | shop

    ______

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    See more Lynn Nguyen iheartmyart.
    See more drawing on iheartmyart.

    Francois Dallegret, Space City - Astronef 732 Space City, 1963, an early Graphic ink drawing

    Dallegret concieved a Space City to be shot to Mars for the purpose of studying reactions of younger generations to conditions of extreme crowding in relation to speed. Dallegret aligned himself with the great innovators of the 20th century, Le Corbusier, Buckmaster Fuller (who exhibited a geodesic dome at the Expo ‘67) and Joe Colombo, whose vision of streamlined modular living corresponded with Dallegret’s own futurism.

    (via expecttheunexpectedtoday)

    ______

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    Gloria Pizzilli
Kamasutra64 Artbook, 2013
Inchiostro Festival Alessandria, 2014
Milano Design Week - Back2Back, 2014
Autumn in Florence, 2012
Turandot di Giacomo Puccini. Guida all’ascolto, 2011, images posted with permission of the artist.
Website | Behance | Blog | Tumblr
______
See more on:♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
More Gloria Pizzilli iheartmyart.More illustration on iheartmyart. Gloria Pizzilli
Kamasutra64 Artbook, 2013
Inchiostro Festival Alessandria, 2014
Milano Design Week - Back2Back, 2014
Autumn in Florence, 2012
Turandot di Giacomo Puccini. Guida all’ascolto, 2011, images posted with permission of the artist.
Website | Behance | Blog | Tumblr
______
See more on:♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
More Gloria Pizzilli iheartmyart.More illustration on iheartmyart. Gloria Pizzilli
Kamasutra64 Artbook, 2013
Inchiostro Festival Alessandria, 2014
Milano Design Week - Back2Back, 2014
Autumn in Florence, 2012
Turandot di Giacomo Puccini. Guida all’ascolto, 2011, images posted with permission of the artist.
Website | Behance | Blog | Tumblr
______
See more on:♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
More Gloria Pizzilli iheartmyart.More illustration on iheartmyart. Gloria Pizzilli
Kamasutra64 Artbook, 2013
Inchiostro Festival Alessandria, 2014
Milano Design Week - Back2Back, 2014
Autumn in Florence, 2012
Turandot di Giacomo Puccini. Guida all’ascolto, 2011, images posted with permission of the artist.
Website | Behance | Blog | Tumblr
______
See more on:♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
More Gloria Pizzilli iheartmyart.More illustration on iheartmyart. Gloria Pizzilli
Kamasutra64 Artbook, 2013
Inchiostro Festival Alessandria, 2014
Milano Design Week - Back2Back, 2014
Autumn in Florence, 2012
Turandot di Giacomo Puccini. Guida all’ascolto, 2011, images posted with permission of the artist.
Website | Behance | Blog | Tumblr
______
See more on:♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
More Gloria Pizzilli iheartmyart.More illustration on iheartmyart.

      Gloria Pizzilli

      1. Kamasutra64 Artbook, 2013
      2. Inchiostro Festival Alessandria, 2014
      3. Milano Design Week - Back2Back, 2014
      4. Autumn in Florence, 2012
      5. Turandot di Giacomo Puccini. Guida all’ascolto, 2011, images posted with permission of the artist.

      Website | Behance | Blog | Tumblr

      ______

      See more on:
      ♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list pinterest  

      More Gloria Pizzilli iheartmyart.
      More illustration on iheartmyart.

      Daan Botlek
Walk the Line, 2014
Paintings on panel and wall at Millerntor Gallery, Hamburg (May 29, 2014).
Groupshow at Frank Taal Gallery, Rotterdam (Jjanuary 10, 2014)
On Paper, 2013
King of Snake, 2012
Part of the exhibition ‘If paradise is half as nice.’ (part 2) in Leipzig, Germany, 2013, images posted with permission of the artist.
Behance | Instagram
______
See more on:♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
More Daan Botlek on iheartmyart.More painting on iheartmyart. Daan Botlek
Walk the Line, 2014
Paintings on panel and wall at Millerntor Gallery, Hamburg (May 29, 2014).
Groupshow at Frank Taal Gallery, Rotterdam (Jjanuary 10, 2014)
On Paper, 2013
King of Snake, 2012
Part of the exhibition ‘If paradise is half as nice.’ (part 2) in Leipzig, Germany, 2013, images posted with permission of the artist.
Behance | Instagram
______
See more on:♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
More Daan Botlek on iheartmyart.More painting on iheartmyart. Daan Botlek
Walk the Line, 2014
Paintings on panel and wall at Millerntor Gallery, Hamburg (May 29, 2014).
Groupshow at Frank Taal Gallery, Rotterdam (Jjanuary 10, 2014)
On Paper, 2013
King of Snake, 2012
Part of the exhibition ‘If paradise is half as nice.’ (part 2) in Leipzig, Germany, 2013, images posted with permission of the artist.
Behance | Instagram
______
See more on:♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
More Daan Botlek on iheartmyart.More painting on iheartmyart. Daan Botlek
Walk the Line, 2014
Paintings on panel and wall at Millerntor Gallery, Hamburg (May 29, 2014).
Groupshow at Frank Taal Gallery, Rotterdam (Jjanuary 10, 2014)
On Paper, 2013
King of Snake, 2012
Part of the exhibition ‘If paradise is half as nice.’ (part 2) in Leipzig, Germany, 2013, images posted with permission of the artist.
Behance | Instagram
______
See more on:♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
More Daan Botlek on iheartmyart.More painting on iheartmyart. Daan Botlek
Walk the Line, 2014
Paintings on panel and wall at Millerntor Gallery, Hamburg (May 29, 2014).
Groupshow at Frank Taal Gallery, Rotterdam (Jjanuary 10, 2014)
On Paper, 2013
King of Snake, 2012
Part of the exhibition ‘If paradise is half as nice.’ (part 2) in Leipzig, Germany, 2013, images posted with permission of the artist.
Behance | Instagram
______
See more on:♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
More Daan Botlek on iheartmyart.More painting on iheartmyart. Daan Botlek
Walk the Line, 2014
Paintings on panel and wall at Millerntor Gallery, Hamburg (May 29, 2014).
Groupshow at Frank Taal Gallery, Rotterdam (Jjanuary 10, 2014)
On Paper, 2013
King of Snake, 2012
Part of the exhibition ‘If paradise is half as nice.’ (part 2) in Leipzig, Germany, 2013, images posted with permission of the artist.
Behance | Instagram
______
See more on:♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list | pinterest  
More Daan Botlek on iheartmyart.More painting on iheartmyart.

        Daan Botlek

        1. Walk the Line, 2014
        2. Paintings on panel and wall at Millerntor Gallery, Hamburg (May 29, 2014).
        3. Groupshow at Frank Taal Gallery, Rotterdam (Jjanuary 10, 2014)
        4. On Paper, 2013
        5. King of Snake, 2012
        6. Part of the exhibition ‘If paradise is half as nice.’ (part 2) in Leipzig, Germany, 2013, images posted with permission of the artist.

        Behance | Instagram

        ______

        See more on:
        ♥ iheartmyart | facebook | twitter | instagram | flickr | mailing list pinterest  

        More Daan Botlek on iheartmyart.
        More painting on iheartmyart.